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Why Do Dogs Pant?
Why Do Dogs Pant?

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Why Do Dogs Pant?

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Panting is when dogs breathe rapidly with their mouth open and tongue hanging out like a slobbery yo-yo. You know what we’re talking about. So other than as an effective method of drool distribution, why do they do it?

 

 

Keeping their cool

Some dogs may occasionally pant when they’re excited or afraid, but the main reason is to help keep themselves from overheating.

In a recent IAMS™ survey,* a majority of dog parents believed that dogs have sweat glands. But dogs don’t sweat like humans do. “We have glands all over our body. Dogs can’t do that,” says 

Opens a new windowDr. Jo Gale, BVetMed CertLAS MRCVS, Senior Manager, Global Science Advocacy at Waltham Petcare Science Institute. “They have sweat glands on their paw pads, but that’s the only place.” They rely on panting to let out warm air and bring in cooler air. All that drool and fluid in their mouth helps dissipate the heat as well. It’s like a big soggy air conditioner. 
 

 

Most mammals, and even many birds, pant to regulate their temperatures. Humans are some of the only creatures who cool down by perspiration. Imagine what dogs think of us losing fluid from all over our bodies, sweating through our clothes and needing to wipe our faces all the time. Fortunately, they love us anyway.

 

 

How to help your overheated dog

Panting is normal, but it expends lots of water, so make sure Fido’s bowl is full of clean, cool H2O, especially during warmer months. 

Opens a new windowDr. Tammie King, Applied Behavior Technical Leader at Waltham Petcare Science Institute, suggests “seeking out cool shade, giving them water and stopping physical activity.”


And it goes without saying — but we’re going to say it anyway — that you should never leave your dog in your vehicle on hot days. Even if they’re driving. Which you shouldn’t let them do either.

 

 

 

Signs of an overheated dog

Some dogs run a higher risk of overheating. “It’s very easy for dogs to overheat on very hot days,” cautions Dr. Jo Gale. “Any dog with a squashed face — bulldogs, pugs, Pekingese — their nasal passages are not able to cool the air as much.” She added that dogs with heavy coats, overweight dogs, and very old or very young pets also can’t control their body temperature as effectively.


If your pooch seems to be panting more than usual or at unusual times, check to see if they’re having trouble breathing, are shaking, or their gums or tongue have noticeably changed color. If so, make sure they have access to water, get them to a cool place and contact your vet.
 

*Surveyed U.S. dog owners, age 18+ 

Sample Size: n=201 

Fielded May 8-10, 2020

Why Do Dogs Pant?
Why Do Dogs Pant?
Why Do Dogs Pant?
  • How to Leash Train a Puppy
    How to Leash Train a Puppy
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    How to Leash Train a Puppy

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    Leash training can help your puppy safely explore the world beyond your house or backyard. It can enhance your dog’s walking experience and help you bond with it better. We must remember that dogs are not born with the ability to walk on a leash, they need to be taught. As their caregivers, we need to help them learn this skill comfortably. 
     

    If you have a large breed pup, it is imperative that you train it while it is still young. Once your fur baby grows up to be heavy, you will have a tough time handling it on a leash. You do not want to be dragged along the ground or see your dog get into an easily avoidable fracas. 
     

    In case you are wondering at what age to start leash training a puppy, here’s your answer: You are start at 10 weeks of its age, however, you must know that it can be done earlier. It will help your pup grow into an obedient pawsome pal. Leash training also makes it easier for you to travel with your pet and embark on exciting adventures seamlessly! Train your puppies while they are still young as it will stay with them for the rest of their lives. 
     

    If you are facing any trouble with how to teach your puppy to walk on a leash, here are some tips to get you started:

    • Pick the right collar

    Picking the right collar is the first step to getting your dog used to a puppy leash. It is imperative that your fur baby feels comfortable in it. So, make sure that the collar is neither too tight nor too loose; there should be space for at least two fingers under it. While leash training your puppy, breathability and comfort is of paramount importance. 
     

    Note: If you plan on training your puppy at an early age, stay attentive during sessions. Since your little furry friend will be at a developing stage, it will outgrow its collar soon. Make sure that you keep checking the fit of the collar and change it as and when needed.

    • Introducing your puppy to a leash

    Your puppy will need some time to get used to the leash. For puppies, this is an alien thing, and they will need some time to adjust and accept this new accessory. You can help your pup ease into this process by trying a few tricks. It needs to resonate a leash with fun times. Let it spend some time playing with the leash. You can also make your canine companion wear it every time you are having a fun time together at home. Do not put it on when it is alone, sad, or irritated.

    • Treats go a long way

    As you teach your puppy how to walk on a leash, remember that rewarding it with treats will only promote good behaviour. Grab a treat in your hands and take a few steps back. This will encourage your pooch to walk towards you to devour its favourite treat. To avoid overeating, you can also reward the pup with toys, praises, or belly rubs. 

    Note: Do not stretch your dog’s leash training for prolonged hours. It might get exhausted and shy away from training.

    • Indoor practice

    Indoor practice is the best way of gauging how your canine companion fares with the concept of walking on leash. This will also help you get your puppy used to the leash without losing control of it. Choose a decent stretch of floor in your home, make sure there are no obstructions, and just start walking with your puppy on a leash. At the end of one stretch, reward it with treats. Stay attentive during these session to know when your pup is ready for the world outside your home.

    • Start with short outdoor walks

    Teaching your puppy how to walk on a leash is going to be full of surprises. If you think that your pet will easily walk on a leash outdoors once it has learnt to do it indoors, you are mistaken. Being curious is only natural and that is exactly what will happen once your four-legged friend realises that it is not at home anymore! Your dog will want to sniff every corner, every plant, and whatever it sets its eyes on. Hence, start with short outdoor walks! 
     

    Note: Carry some treats with you to encourage your puppy to follow you! 
     

    Remember that patience is key! And your furry friend is not the only one who needs to be patient during this process. Your puppy is going to need some time to get used to this walking style and you need to give it that time. Moreover, make sure that this transition is smooth and comfortable for your pup. Once you start putting these tips into action, you two can start taking long strolls together.